Item Viewer MemReg Item #: 7223

Winston Churchill- Churchill, the artist, to his first love Lady Lytton, with terrific American association.

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Registered: 2010-06-02 08:52
Owner: University Archives
Item Type: Politics > Letter
View Mode: Public
Status: For Sale
Sale Price: NA
 Tag/Signer Name Tag Type Received AuthenticityDate
45753

Winston Churchill (1874~1965)


[Politics>Head of State; Author; Nobel Winner ]
S
Signed
PU
Purchase
3
Authentic (Probably)
1951-03-01
Churchill, the artist, to his first love Lady Lytton, with terrific American association. Typed Letter Signed “Yours dentally / W,” one page, 7.5’ x 9.5”. 28 Hyde Park Gate, London, March 1, 1951. To The Lady Lytton, the former Pamela Chichele-Plowden. File hole in upper left. Slight repair at fold on verso. Docketed on verso “March 1951,” possibly by Lady Lytton. Fine condition. In full, “I send you some of the American Christmas cards of this year. They had a two million sale over there. As they reproduce in over a dozen colours, instead of our three or four, they get very good results. It was lovely your coming down for the weekend. Rufus and Puff were also very happy together. I am laid up with an unexpectedly violent reaction to a penicillin injection which I took. I had a dreadful night with pain and a swollen face. I have, alas, had to cancel the Freedom and the Cutlers’ Feast at Sheffield next Monday and Tuesday.” The Associated Press had reported in a February 20, 1950 story, that “Winston Churchill’s paintings are going to appear on American Christmas cards next December. The Hallmark Greeting Card Company said today it had arranged to use 18 paintings by the former British prime minister, long an Amateur painter...” On November 24, 1951, “The New York Times” reported that “the Hallmark Gallery Artists group ... includes cards representing the work of Grandma Moses, Winston S. Churchill, and Norman Rockwell...” Churchill tells Lady Lytton that because of his “unexpected violent reaction to a penicillin injection” and “a dreadful night with pain and a swollen face,” he had to cancel “the Freedom and the Cutlers’ Feast at Sheffield next Monday and Tuesday,” March 5th and 6th. However, according to John Ramsden in “Man of the Century: Winston Churchill and his Legend since 1945” (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), it appears that the Freedom and the Cutler’s Feast were postponed, ostensibly because Churchill could not attend. Ramsden writes that Sheffield was “able to ensure hat the new freeman [honorary citizen] came to collect his honour in person, probably by timing the 1951 ceremony to coincide with the annual Cutlers’ Fast, a banquet then frequently addressed by national leaders, given the importance of Sheffield-made cutlery to the export trade ... On the day of the ceremony, 16 April 1951, the ‘Sheffield Telegraph’ editorialized ‘with proud memories’ on Churchill ... The following day it devoted three of its six pages to reporting the visit ... on the 18th there were three more pages, this time reporting the Cutlers’ Feast ... There was a parade ... Buses were diverted and tram routes suspended to allow large crowds to gather in the streets, and several hundred were still waiting for a glimpse when at almost midnight he emerged from a car bringing him from the civil banquet back to his hotel, their persistence rewarded by the familiar ‘V-sign for Sheffield’, God bless you all,’ and (to an eleven-year-old) ‘It’s time you were in bed.’...” When she had spent a weekend with Churchill in February, the widow Lady Lytton had brought her dog, Puff. Rufus was Churchill’s poodle. He tells Lady Lytton, to whom he had proposed marriage fifty years earlier, that “Rufus and Puff were also very happy together.” Her husband, Victor Alexander George Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 2nd Earl of Lytton, had died in 1947. From the November 9, 2003, article in “The Observer” by David Smith, Arts and Media Correspondent, “Letters Reveal Heartbreak of Young Winston.” In part, “Winston Churchill suffered heartbreak when his hopes of marrying the first great love of his life were dashed ... Churchill proposed to Pamela Plowden, a renowned society beauty, when he was in his early twenties, and it is thought that they were informally engaged. But just two years later she married Victor, Earl of Lytton, the son of a Viceroy of India ... Churchill fell in love at first sight with Pamela in Hyderabad in November 1896. He wrote to his mother: 'She is the most beautiful girl I have ever seen.' Pamela, a few months his senior, was the daughter of Sir Trevor Chichele-Plowden, at that time the Resident in Hyderabad. She was the first significant love of Churchill's life, and his mother, Lady Randolph Churchill, wrote to him before his return from South Africa: ‘Pamela is devoted to you and if yr love has grown as hers - I have no doubt it is only a question of time for you 2 marry.’” Lady Lytton died in 1971.
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